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Contemporary Gose

Contemporary goses are straw to medium amber, or, may take on the hue of added fruits or other ingredients if present. appearance is cloudy/hazy with yeast character, and may have evidence of continued fermentation activity. a wide variety of herbal, spice, floral or fruity aromas other than found in traditional leipzig-style gose are present, in harmony with other aromas. horsey, leathery or earthy aromas contributed by brettanomyces yeasts may be evident but have a very low profile, as this beer is not excessively aged. hop aroma is not perceived. malt sweetness is not perceived to very low. they typically contain malted barley and unmalted wheat, with some traditional varieties containing oats. hop flavor is not perceived. hop bitterness is not perceived. a wide variety of herbal, spice, floral or fruity flavors other than found in traditional leipzig-style gose, are present in harmony with the overall flavor profile. salt (table salt) character is traditional in low amounts, but may vary from absent to present in contemporary gose. horsey, leathery or earthy flavors contributed by brettanomyces yeasts may be evident but have a very low profile, as this beer is not excessively aged. contemporary gose may be fermented with pure beer yeast strains, or with yeast mixed with bacteria. contemporary gose may be spontaneously fermented, similarly to belgian-style gueuze/lambic beers, and should exhibit complexity of acidic, flavor and aroma contributed by introduction of wild yeast and bacteria into the fermentation. low to medium lactic acid character is evident in all examples as sharp, refreshing sourness. a primary difference between belgian gueuze and gose is that gose is served at a much younger age. gose is typically enjoyed fresh and carbonated. overall complexity of flavors and aromas sought while maintaining a balance between acidity, yeast-enhanced spice and refreshment is ideal. body is low to medium-low.

Why Only Craft Beers?

The number one reason is craft beer tastes better than the "beer water" that is mass produced and mass marketed by the big beer companies. Craft beer tastes better because craft brewers spend their time focusing the quality of their beer rather than focusing on their marketing campaigns and stock prices.

Oh yeah! Craft beers can pack a punch. Most craft beers range from 5-10% ABV, but some can reach 20%, 30%, and even 40% ABV.